fb_thumb
Here’s What Your Favorite Music Says About Your Personality
Your taste in music could reveal insights into your personality, according to two studies published in Psychological Science . Researchers from Cambridge and US universities surveyed more than 21,000 people in two separate online surveys to see how five main personality types known collectively as the Big Five those that are open-minded, extroverted, agreeable, neurotic, and conscientious matched up with different genres of music. These included tunes that ...
Psychological Science - Mon. Jul 22
A solution to psychology’s reproducibility problem just failed its first test
Behavior change is difficult just ask any psychologist. A new study shows behavior change among psychologists is no different. Efforts to improve the robustness of research by asking psychologists to state their methods and goals ahead of time, a process called preregistration, have stumbled at the first hurdle. Preregistration is not as easy as it may seem, says Aline Claesen, a psychologist at the Catholic University of Leuven KU Leuven in Belgium. She a ...
Psychological Science - Mon. Jul 15
To Appear More Intimidating, Just Tilt Your Head Down, Study Suggests
Facial expression can convey a staggering amount of information not just what kind of mood a person is in or real-time emotional reactions, but also more complex concepts like dominance and subservience. But a new study out in the journal Psychological Science shows that there s a way to communicate dominance that doesn t involve moving the facial muscles at all just tilt your head downward slightly and maintain eye contact. In one experiment, participants ...
Psychological Science - Mon. Jul 15
The Science Of Smiles, Real And Fake
The notion that you can smile your way to happiness is an enduring one. Back in the 1800s, Charles Darwin was among the first to come up with what modern scientists further developed into the 8220 facial feedback hypothesis. 8221 That 8217 s the idea that smiling can make you happier and frowning can make you sadder or angrier that changing your facial expression can intensify or even transform your mood. Dick Van Dyke sang about the phenomenon and so did ...
Psychological Science - Mon. Jul 15
Political Passion Inspires Trust—Even From Opponents
There 8217 s a lot of evidence suggesting that Americans trust each other less and less . But new research suggests an unorthodox solution to our political divide firmly expressing our political opinions, even when they might prove unpopular. 8220 Across five studies using a variety of contentious social issues, I found evidence that people trust others who demonstrate strong feelings about social issues, even when they disagree with or dislike them, 8221 ...
Psychological Science - Mon. Jun 17
Why This Image of a Woodpecker Is Creeping People Out
When a seemingly innocuous image of a woodpecker stashing away its acorn supply made the internet rounds, Twitter-users expressed revulsion. They weren 8217 t reacting to the bird or the actual acorns, but to the set of holes in which the bird was storing its treasure. Clustered in an irregular pattern, the holes were triggering a condition called trypophobia . To someone with this phobia, an otherwise benign and even downright gorgeous image can spark fea ...
Psychological Science - Mon. Jun 17
Lonely young adults ‘in every kind of neighbourhood’
Academics from King 8217 s College London found loneliness was an issue in urban as well as rural areas and in wealthy areas as well as deprived ones. They say loneliness is a particular problem among young adults 8211 regardless of gender or socio-economic background. The study says these adults are more likely to have a negative view of where they live, compounding their isolation. The King 8217 s College research says 8220 The findings of this study rev ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 27
Collaborative problem solvers are made not born – here’s what you need to ...
Challenges are a fact of life. Whether it s a high-tech company figuring out how to shrink its carbon footprint, or a local community trying to identify new revenue sources, people are continually dealing with problems that require input from others. In the modern world, we face problems that are broad in scope and great in scale of impact think of trying to understand and identify potential solutions related to climate change, cybersecurity or authoritari ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 27
‘ScreenTime: Diane Sawyer Reporting,’ 2-hour ABC News special, challenges fami...
How much time do you spend looking at your phone If you 8217 re like the average American, it adds up to about 49 days out of the year. ABC News 8217 Diane Sawyer spent six months traveling the country and talking to families, teachers, doctors and even tech insiders to put together a two-hour special about how screen time is affecting us and what we can do about it. As part of the special, researchers helped Sawyer 8217 s team recreate a study in which pa ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 27
What Actually Works to Get People to Vaccinate?
Does public shaming work Being kind and non-judgmental Banning people from public places and fining parents 1,000 As communities deal with the United States 8217 worst measles outbreaks in 25 years and the country faces losing its 8220 measles-free 8221 status, Americans are debating how best to encourage the reluctant to get vaccinated. Measles is an infectious disease that can be deadly and has no cure although some treatments can make the symptoms less ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 27
The Surprising Boost You Get From Strangers
We were five minutes into the worst turbulence I d ever experienced approaching Boston s Logan International Airport in a severe winter storm when I turned to the woman next to me and said Hey, would you mind chatting with me for a few minutes I m really nervous. We hadn t spoken much during the flight, other than the usual pleasantries. But my seatmate seemed friendly. And I suddenly felt desperate for a human connection. Sure, my name is Sue, the woman r ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 27
We Gossip About 52 Minutes A Day. That May Not Be As Toxic As It Sounds
Almost everyone gossips. And a new study finds that people spend about 52 minutes per day, on average, talking to someone about someone else who is not present. But here 8217 s the surprise Despite the assumption that most gossip is trash talk, the study finds that the vast majority of gossip is nonjudgmental chitchat. 8220 We actually found that the overwhelming majority of gossip was neutral, 8221 says study author Megan Robbins , a psychologist at the U ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 27