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Study: Mental conditioning with cute animal pictures can rekindle your relatio...
James K. McNulty of Florida State University and his team of psychological scientists were not expecting this. They d wondered if they could use conditioning to warm the hearts of married couples gone a little cold from numbing day to day life by building associations between spouses faces and pictures of adorable puppies and bunnies. I was actually a little surprised that it worked, McNulty tells APS , a publication of the Association of Psychological Sci ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 28
How Useful Is Fear?
Fr anklin D. Roosevelt no doubt meant to be soothing when he insisted, The only thing we have to fear is fear itself. A quick and terrifying tour through the academic literature on fear, though, reveals just how much heavy lifting that only was doing. Our fears run broad and deep, and are every bit as diverse as we are. The 2017 version of Chapman University s Survey of American Fears tabbed corruption of government officials as the most common fear, affli ...
Psychological Science - Fri. May 18
People can’t be educated into vaccinations, but behavioral nudges help, study ...
Vaccines were one of the great inventions of modern history. They helped stop America 8217 s polio epidemic in the 1950s. And yet many people are reluctant to get their shots or vaccinate their children. A study published Wednesday concludes that using education campaigns, and simply trying to persuade people to get the shots, is far less effective than using indirect behavioral nudges. The reason most people don 8217 t get vaccinations for themselves or t ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 14
Even minor stress can impact long-term health, study warns
That exposure to stress is a risk factor for many health problems, such as cardiovascular issues , anxiety and depression , and chronic pain , is a familiar idea. Yet we may think that it 8217 s only certain kinds of major stressors such as getting fired, going through a breakup, or undergoing surgery that significantly impact our lives. But, recent research explains that even small stressors can harm our long-term health if we hold on to how they make us ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 14
The New Retirement: Near the Kids
8212 Ms. Ryerson said that the health effects of prolonged isolation have been found to be the equivalent of smoking 15 cigarettes a day, according to a study in Perspectives on Psychological Science . A study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America also found that social isolation and loneliness are associated with higher risk of mortality in adults 52 and older. Read the whole story The New York Times News g ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 14
Facebook announces new dating feature because romance isn’t dead
Facebook will soon include a dating feature among its services, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced at the company s F8 Developer Conference in San Jose, California on Tuesday. The feature will sling Facebook into a domain in which it has long played a behind-the-scenes role but never entered directly. These days, many digital matchmaking services like Tinder require users to sign up for the app through their Facebook accounts. In this way, Facebook 8217 s pivot ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 14
Birth Control Probably Doesn’t Change Who You’re Attracted to, Study Finds
A commonly touted theory about how women s attraction to men works might be all wrong, suggests a new paper published this week in Psychological Science . Prior, small experiments have found that birth control pills and ovulation could change a woman s sexual preferences. Now, a large new study has found that women s preferences for men s faces are reliably stable, regardless of whether they re taking birth control pills or whether they re ovulating. Some ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 14
Social science research makes surprise appearance in rollout of Melania Trumpâ...
Social science research got a shoutout this week when U.S. first lady Melania Trump unveiled Be Best, her signature initiative on children s health. Coming from an administration that has often denigrated the value of such research, that s good news. And although the scientists welcome the high-level attention, they note that the study the White House cited doesn t really address a major thrust of the initiative. They also are in the dark about how they ap ...
Psychological Science - Mon. May 14
Imagining a Positive Outcome Biases Subsequent Memories
Imagining that a future event will go well may lead you to remember it more positively after it s over, according to findings from research published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Our results suggest that imagining an upcoming event can essentially color your memory for that event once it comes to pass, says psychological scientist Aleea Devitt of Harvard University, first author on the study . Research ...
Psychological Science - Sat. Apr 28
Imagining an Object Can Change How We Hear Sounds Later
Seeing an object at the same time that you hear sound coming from somewhere else can lead to the ventriloquist illusion and its aftereffect, but research suggests that simply imagining the object produces the same illusory results. The findings are published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science . The sensory information we imagine is often treated by the brain in the same way as information streaming in to us fr ...
Psychological Science - Mon. Apr 23
Lingering Negative Responses to Stress Linked With Health a Decade Later
People whose negative emotional responses to stress carry over to the following day are more likely to report health problems and physical limitations later in life compared with peers who are able to let it go, according to findings published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science . Our research shows that negative emotions that linger after even minor, daily stressors have important implications for our long-ter ...
Psychological Science - Fri. Apr 13
The Emotions We Feel May Shape What We See
Our emotional state in a given moment may influence what we see, according to findings published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science . In two experiments , researchers found that participants saw a neutral face as smiling more when it was paired with an unseen positive image. The research shows that humans are active perceivers, say psychological scientist Erika Siegel of the University of California, San Franc ...
Psychological Science - Fri. Apr 13