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Polluted Air May Pollute Our Morality
Exposure to air pollution, even imagining exposure to air pollution, may lead to unethical behavior, according to findings published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science . A combination of archival and experimental studies indicates that exposure to air pollution, either physically or mentally, is linked with unethical behavior such as crime and cheating. The experimental findings suggest that this association m ...
Psychological Science - Mon. Feb 12
Understanding Mental Disorder through a Scientific Lens
Diagnosing mental-health issues may seem straightforward Patients discuss their symptoms and a clinician matches those symptoms to a disorder and devises an appropriate treatment. In reality, this view belies the complexity inherent in understanding, classifying, and diagnosing psychiatric phenomena. Advances in clinical science over the past several decades have led to major improvements in how mental disorder is diagnosed and treated millions of individu ...
Psychological Science - Wed. Feb 7
Thinking About Germs Makes People Concerned About How They Look
Simply thinking about potential infection seems to increase people s concerns about their own physical appearance, especially if they are chronic germ worriers, according to new research in Psychological Science . The findings suggest that the possibility of contagion activates the so-called behavioral immune system, leading individuals to focus not only on their vulnerability to disease but also how they appear to others. The behavioral immune system help ...
Psychological Science - Wed. Feb 7
“Will I Look Dumb?” When Virtual Assistants Deter Help-Seeking
Virtual assistants have become increasingly sophisticated and more humanlike since the days when Clippy asked if you needed help with your document. These assistants are intended to make programs and apps easier to use, but research published in Psychological Science suggests that humanlike virtual assistants may actually deter some people from seeking help on tasks that are supposed to measure achievement. Psychological Science is a journal of the Associa ...
Psychological Science - Wed. Feb 7
College Branding Makes Beer More Salient to Underage Students
In recent years, major beer companies have tried to capitalize on the salience of students university affiliations, unveiling marketing campaigns and products 8212 such as fan cans, store displays, and billboard ads 8212 that pair beer with university colors, mascots, and logos. Research published in the January 2018 issue of Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science , shows that such campaigns may enhance the motivatio ...
Psychological Science - Wed. Feb 7
Women Beat Expectations When Playing Chess Against Men
Data from 160,000 ranked chess players and more than 5 million chess matches suggest that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings, according to findings published in Psychological Science . The study results indicate that women players are not affected by negative stereotypes about women s chess abilities during competition games, in contrast with previous research on the phenomenon of stereotype threat ...
Psychological Science - Wed. Feb 7
APS: Leading the Way in Replication and Open Science
The Association for Psychological Science APS promotes replication and open science practices as part of a broader effort to strengthen research methods and practices across all areas of psychological science. The Association s efforts date back a number of years, to when few other organizations were addressing these issues, and the Association pioneered several innovations that have since been widely adopted. Below are just some of APS initiatives in thes ...
Psychological Science - Wed. Feb 7
Where Psychological Science and Cancer Research Unite
Some of the most fascinating research happens on the edges of disciplines. When materials science overlaps with entomology, a clothing company can make a hat out of spider silk, grown in vats of yeast. When public health and anthropology overlap, one researcher can transform life in a whole refugee camp to improve hygiene, vaccinate dogs to prevent rabies, and clean up garbage in the streets through festive health parades . The same goes for psychological ...
Psychological Science - Fri. Dec 15
Linking Personality with Organizations, Occupations, and Income
Science has revealed how our personalities shape our academic performance to our mortality. So surely, personality affects our job choices and job successes, right Researchers have found that personalities do shape very general career paths e.g., extraverts may do better in communications -type jobs . Others looked for a clear link between personality types and income and found none. Extraverts don t earn any more income than introverts. Two recent studies ...
Psychological Science - Wed. Dec 13
How to Learn What Not to Study
There s nothing worse in the world of academics than getting back a test you felt really confident about, only to realize you had seriously misjudged your grasp of the material. New research published in Psychological Science suggests that the best way to avoid overestimating your abilities is to reflect on what you ve learned in the past rather than trying to guess at how you ll perform in the future. Further research may be needed before these findings a ...
Psychological Science - Wed. Dec 13
Workers Pursuing a Calling Face a Double-Edged Sword
Behavioral scientists characterize a calling as a feeling of being drawn to a vocation and engaging in it meaningfully and passionately. A calling is often pro-social in nature a person feels called to a particular career through a desire to improve their world. But, having a calling does not automatically make one more employable, according to new studies from behavioral scientists at Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. While those with a sense of calling ma ...
Psychological Science - Sat. Dec 9
Augmented-Reality Technology Could Help Treat ‘Lazy Eye’
When signals between the brain and one eye go awry, input from the other eye can become predominant, a condition called amblyopia or lazy eye. Amblyopia is common and it is typically treated by forcing the less dominant eye to adapt, either through lab-based training or wearing an eyepatch. But new research suggests that people may be able to use wearable augmented-reality technology to reduce this visual discrepancy as they go about everyday activities. T ...
Psychological Science - Sat. Dec 9
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